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Check out some of the latest things Justin has been working on.

The 20/20 Experience
Release : March 19, 2013
Peak Chart Position : #1
Purchase on iTunes - Download


Take back the night
Release : 7/12/2013
Peak Chart Position : #29
Purchase on iTunes - Download


Mirrors
Release : 3/3/2013
Peak Chart Position : #2
Purchase on iTunes - Download


Holy Grail with Jay Z
Release :
Peak Chart Position : #4
Purchase on iTunes - Download


The 20/20 Experience 2 of 2
Release : 9/30/2013
Peak Chart Position :
Purchase on iTunes - Download


TKO
Release :
Peak Chart Position : #54
Purchase on iTunes - Download


 







unfortunetly Justin is not on anything at the moment

check out Justin in a city near you!

04-07-08 Manchester, England - Phones 4u Arena
04-11-12 Birmingham, England - LG Arena
04-14, 16 Zurich, Switzerland - Hallenstadion
04-18 Arnhem, Netherlands - GelreDome
04-20, 22 Koln, Germany - Lanxess Arena
04-24 Berlin, Germany - O2 World
04-26 Paris, France - Stade de France
05-01-02 Antwerp, Belgium - Sportpaleis
05-04 Hamburg, Germany - O2 World
05-06 Copenhagen, Denmark - Parken
05-08 Oslo, Norway - Telenor Arena
05-10 Stockholm, Sweden - Tele2 Arena
05-12 Helsinki, Finland - Hartwall Areena
05-15 St. Petersburg, Russia - SKK
05-17 Moscow, Russia - Olimpiyskiy
05-23 Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates - Du Arena
05-26 Istanbul, Turkey - Itu Stadium
05-28 Tel Aviv, Israel - Hayarkon Park
05-30 Rabat, Morocco - Festival Mawazine
06-01 Lisbon, Portugal - Parque Das Nações
06-03 Prague, Czech Republic - O2 Arena
06-04 Vienna, Austria - Wiener Stadhalle
06-06 Berlin, Germany - O2 World Arena
06-08 Frankfurt, Germany - Commerz-Bank Arena
06-10 London, England - O2 Arena
07-09 Buffalo, NY - First Niagara Center
07-12 Charlotte, NC - Time Warner Cable Arena
07-14 Baltimore, MD - Baltimore Arena
07-16 Albany, NY - Times Union Center
07-18 Uncasville, CT - Mohegan Sun
07-19 Boston, MA - TD Garden
07-22 Ottawa, Ontario - Canadian Tire Centre
07-25-26 Montreal, Quebec - Bell Centre
07-28 Detroit, MI - The Palace of Auburn Hills
07-30 Kansas City, MO - Sprint Center
08-03 New Orleans, LA - New Orleans Arena
08-05 San Antonio, TX - AT&T Center
08-08 Las Vegas, NV - MGM Grand Garden Arena
08-11 San Jose, CA - SAP Center
11-20 Portland, OR - MODA Center
11-22 Oakland, CA - Oracle Arena
11-24 Los Angeles, CA - The Forum
11-28 Las Vegas, NV - MGM Grand Garden Arena
12-01 Houston, TX - Toyota Center
12-03 Dallas, TX - American Airlines Center
12-05 Oklahoma City, OK - Chesapeake Energy Arena
12-08 Chicago, IL - United Center
12-10 Toronto, Ontario - Air Canada Centre
12-13 Uncasville, CT - Mohegan Sun
12-14 Brooklyn, NY - Barclays Center
12-17 Philadelphia, PA - Wells Fargo Center
12-19 Nashville, TN - Bridgestone Arena
12-20 Atlanta, GA - Gwinnett Center


Site : worldofjustin.com
Owner : Jess M
Co Webs : Amber and Daphne
Hosted by : Hollywood.com / Starzz Network
Best Viewed : iPad, iPad mini, desktop and laptop. (site is "device ready" therefor the theme becomes easier to view on smaller devices)
Opened since : September 24, 2003
Viewers since 2003 :

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L A T E S T I M A G E S
New pictures added daily


Any new images added to the gallery, will be autoatically added here first!

In the years since News Corp. bought it, the name “MySpace” has become a synonym for a certain type of epic freefall, the kind that can only happen in the frictionless atmosphere of the internet. When something so big plunges so far so fast, it generates a lot of downward momentum. Anyone who tries to reverse its trajectory risks getting pulled down with it.

But what if MySpace wasn’t really a disaster in the first place? Or, rather, what if there was a substantial success concealed within the failure, one that could form the nucleus of a healthy new business?

That’s the view of brothers Chris and Tim Vanderhook. A year ago, their ad network, Specific Media, bought MySpace from News Corp. for the fire-sale price of $35 million. Their partner in the deal was singer/actor Justin Timberlake.

Investing in tech companies is quite the fashion now for young entertainers, but Timberlake’s no mere digital dilettante. Nor is his presence a publicity stunt. His role is to help MySpace rediscover what the Vanderhooks say ought to have been its core mission all along: connecting musicians to their fans.

Musical artists were among the first to flock to MySpace, and they were the last loyalists to stick around when most casual users had moved on to Facebook and Twitter. “If you think about the MySpace brand, to the average consumer it was negative, but to the artist community it was positive,” says Tim, Specific Media’s CEO. “They need MySpace to succeed.”

Musicians only soured on MySpace after a relaunch in October 2010 that took away a lot of the functionality they relied on to promote their music and touring to their fans. “They ended up alienating who their core was,” says Tim.

Still, the orientation lingers. When Specific Media surveyed the site’s remaining registered users last year to find out what they were hoping to get out of Myspace, 60% said they were there in hopes of getting discovered.

The Vanderhooks approached the idea of buying MySpace with a vague idea of refocusing it around music. They approached Timberlake — “We knew we needed a third leg of the stool,” says Tim — who convinced them that they key was to win back artists by giving them a platform from which they could run their businesses and manage their brands.

The new MySpace is just that. It’s not a social network per se but a socially-powered venue wherein music fans can experience artists through every facet of their output — music, videos, photos, profiles, social feeds, live events and ticket sales. “MySpace is the only site in the world where you can get everything an artist does if you’re interested in that artist,” says Chris. “To do all those things would probably take you 30 different properties.”

In essence, MySpace is going from being a Facebook also-ran to being a more comprehensive Spotify alternative. In fact, its music catalog, at 42 million songs, is more than twice as large as Spotify’s. “It’s the world’s largest library of music,” says Chris. “It dwarfs anybody else’s.” (To be fair, the bulk of the difference consists of long-tail stuff from unsigned and unknown artists.)

After a year of rebuilding both the site’s front-end and back-end, the new site is almost ready for its public debut. “We had to take a billion dollars’ worth of technology investment and trash it” because of unfixable problems such as slow page load times, says Tim.

An employee-only beta period is now under way. Later this year, it will open up to artists, followed by the public.

Even now, with the site still showing its News Corp.-era face, MySpace’s tighter focus is starting to show results, say the Vanderhooks. After shedding audience at the rate of 3 million unique users a month for two straight years, it has stabilized at 30 million uniques and begun slowly climbing back up.

Would progress be faster if MySpace didn’t have that troublesome name weighing it down? The brothers say no. They never considered changing it. “Why would I have bought it if I were going to change the game?” asks Tim.

“We believe in the brand,” says Chris. “We’re not into positive territory yet, but we’re starting to notch it toward neutral.”

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