Justin as well as many other celebrities have all participated in the ALS "ice bucket challenge" to raise awerness for the charity. you can donate to the cause here!

07-09 Buffalo, NY - First Niagara Center
07-10 manhatten, NY - hammerstein ballroom
07-12 Charlotte, NC - Time Warner Cable Arena
07-14 Baltimore, MD - Baltimore Arena
07-16 Albany, NY - Times Union Center
07-18 Uncasville, CT - Mohegan Sun
07-19 Boston, MA - TD Garden
07-22 Ottawa, Ontario - Canadian Tire Centre
07-25-26 Montreal, Quebec - Bell Centre
07-28 Detroit, MI - The Palace of Auburn Hills
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12-14 Brooklyn, NY - Barclays Center
12-17 Philadelphia, PA - Wells Fargo Center
12-19 Nashville, TN - Bridgestone Arena
12-20 Atlanta, GA - Gwinnett Center


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Check out some of the latest things Justin has been working on.

Runner Runner
Release : 2014
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Nsync Essentials
Release : July 29, 2014
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love never felt so good
Release : May 13, 2014
Peak Chart Position : #20
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not a bad thing
Release : 2/24/2014
Peak Chart Position : #8
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The 20/20 Experience 2 of 2
Release : 9/30/2013
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inside Llewyn Davis

justin-timberlake-amas-2013-650-430

Justin Timberlake, so often shuttling between movies and music, for once didn’t have to choose.

In the Coen brothers’ “Inside Llewyn Davis” Timberlake plays a supporting role as a cheery, sweater-wearing 1960s folk musician. But he also collaborated with producer T Bone Burnett on the movie’s memorable period songs and helped shape the film’s most unforgettable and comic tune, “Please Mr. Kennedy.”

“It’s the first time that I’ve gotten to kind of do a lot of things that I love to do at the same time,” Timberlake said in a recent interview by phone from the road, where he’s on tour. “It will always be a milestone for me to get to write, sing, act and bring it all together.”

For the multitasking Timberlake (Burnett calls him “a quadruple threat”), the film was a rare chance to combine his talents: a Coen playground staked out between worlds Timberlake usually navigates separately. Some fans and media seem to want him to pick a side: musician or actor.

“I don’t even know what I am, man,” he chuckles.

The various Timberlakes are uniquely on display at the moment. “Inside Llewyn Davis” opened nationally Friday. He’s in the midst of touring “The 20/20 Experience,” his Grammy-nominated return to music after a spell in movies like “The Social Network.” And this weekend, he was the musical guest on “Saturday Night Live,” where the former Mouseketeer first revealed his comedy chops.

The folk revival music of “Inside Llewyn Davis” is quite a distance from Timberlake’s “Suit and Tie” or “My Love,” but Burnett doesn’t think much of genre divisions.

“He’s from Memphis, says Burnett. “He’s an R&B singer, basically. But he’s got a beautiful voice and he’s got incredible tone and he can sing anything he wants to. A song is a song.”

“Inside Llewyn Davis” is about a struggling and bitter folk musician (the title character, played by Oscar Isaac) in 1961 Greenwich Village, the cusp of Bob Dylan’s arrival. Timberlake plays a friend of his with a rosier outlook and less concerns with selling-out. The movie is filled with full performances of songs, all but one of which were recorded live.

Work on the film began with the music: “We found the characters through the type of music they did,” says Timberlake.

Timberlake went to Burnett’s Los Angeles home to work on “Please Mr. Kennedy.” The song, whose chorus goes “Please Mr. Kennedy, don’t shoot me into outer-space,” is the comedic high point of the film, and one of the strangest songs that will ever be credited to Timberlake (along with Burnett and the Coens). The premise, Burnett says, was astronaut John Glenn having second thoughts.

The song is roughly based on “Please Mr. Kennedy,” a 1962 novelty song by the Goldcoast Singers that pleads to the president not to be shipped off to Vietnam. It went through several other different iterations through the 60s. (Because the song is based on previously recorded material, it’s ineligible for an Academy Award.)

“There was a novelty song and then there was a parody of the novelty song,” says Burnett. “Then there was another parody of the novelty song. Now we’ve done a rewrite on a take-off of a parody of a novelty song.”

While working on the song with Burnett, Timberlake wanted to get his own guitar, so the two stopped into a music shop in San Fernando Valley. Burnett says Timberlake “put some sex into it, put some swing into it.”

“I just started strumming these chords and strumming in a way that we felt was almost like (the Beach Boys’) “Surfin’ Safari” or a Coasters tune,” says Timberlake. “It was just one of those things where when the punch lines fit in with the melody so good. We kind of just wrote the song in the back of this guitar shop.”

When the song was later recorded in the studio and on film, the silliness grew. Though “Please Mr. Kennedy” becomes a hit in the film, it’s everything Llewyn detests about music. It’s a pop music hell for him; he’s just there for some quick cash.

With Timberlake and Isaac (a proficient musician, himself) on guitar, they’re joined by Adam Driver (“Girls”) who, in a cowboy hat, adds some of the more ridiculous harmonies. (“Adam Driver is a deeply courageous actor,” says Burnett.) Ethan Coen, in particular, pushed them to add quirks like a repeated “pah- pah- pah-” before the “please.”

Molded by Burnett, Timberlake, the Coen brothers, Isaac and Driver, the song may very well be one of the most absurd collections of talent for a recording. It’s also a hit. Moviegoers and critics have raved about “Please Mr. Kennedy” since the film first debuted at the Cannes Film Festival in May.

But the unusual group of musicians, actors and filmmakers was perfectly suited to Timberlake. He also jumped in to sing bass on the a cappella “Auld Triangle” with the Punch Brothers and Marcus Mumford. It was a surreal swirl of music and moviemaking. The Coens, says Timberlake, are “the equivalent of Dylan in the film industry.”

“We just all jammed together for a couple weeks,” says Timberlake. “So you felt like this counter-culture collective.”

“I don’t like rules of `well, this is what you do, or this is the picture frame you’re supposed to live in,’” he says. “You just never know what might come out of trying everything.”

 

5654541Justin Timberlake, so often shuttling between movies and music, for once didn’t have to choose.

In the Coen brothers’ “Inside Llewyn Davis” Timberlake plays a supporting role as a cheery, sweater-wearing 1960s folk musician. But he also collaborated with producer T Bone Burnett on the movie’s memorable period songs and helped shape the film’s most unforgettable and comic tune, “Please Mr. Kennedy.”

“It’s the first time that I’ve gotten to kind of do a lot of things that I love to do at the same time,” Timberlake said in a recent interview by phone from the road, where he’s on tour. “It will always be a milestone for me to get to write, sing, act and bring it all together.”

For the multitasking Timberlake (Burnett calls him “a quadruple threat”), the film was a rare chance to combine his talents: a Coen playground staked out between worlds Timberlake usually navigates separately. Some fans and media seem to want him to pick a side: musician or actor.

“I don’t even know what I am, man,” he chuckles.

The various Timberlakes are uniquely on display at the moment. “Inside Llewyn Davis” opens nationally Friday. He’s in the midst of touring “The 20/20 Experience,” his Grammy-nominated return to music after a spell in movies like “The Social Network.” And this weekend, he’s the musical guest on “Saturday Night Live,” where the former Mouseketeer first revealed his comedy chops.

The folk revival music of “Inside Llewyn Davis” is quite a distance from Timberlake’s “Suit and Tie” or “My Love,” but Burnett doesn’t think much of genre divisions.

“He’s from Memphis, says Burnett. “He’s an R&B singer, basically. But he’s got a beautiful voice and he’s got incredible tone and he can sing anything he wants to. A song is a song.”

“Inside Llewyn Davis” is about a struggling and bitter folk musician (the title character, played by Oscar Isaac) in 1961 Greenwich Village, the cusp of Bob Dylan’s arrival. Timberlake plays a friend of his with a rosier outlook and less concerns with selling-out. The movie is filled with full performances of songs, all but one of which were recorded live.

Work on the film began with the music: “We found the characters through the type of music they did,” says Timberlake.

Timberlake went to Burnett’s Los Angeles home to work on “Please Mr. Kennedy.” The song, whose chorus goes “Please Mr. Kennedy, don’t shoot me into outer-space,” is the comedic high point of the film, and one of the strangest songs that will ever be credited to Timberlake (along with Burnett and the Coens). The premise, Burnett says, was astronaut John Glenn having second thoughts.

The song is roughly based on “Please Mr. Kennedy,” a 1962 novelty song by the Goldcoast Singers that pleads to the president not to be shipped off to Vietnam. It went through several other different iterations through the 60s. (Because the song is based on previously recorded material, it’s ineligible for an Academy Award.)

“There was a novelty song and then there was a parody of the novelty song,” says Burnett. “Then there was another parody of the novelty song. Now we’ve done a rewrite on a take-off of a parody of a novelty song.”

While working on the song with Burnett, Timberlake wanted to get his own guitar, so the two stopped into a music shop in San Fernando Valley. Burnett says Timberlake “put some sex into it, put some swing into it.”

“I just started strumming these chords and strumming in a way that we felt was almost like (the Beach Boys’) “Surfin’ Safari” or a Coasters tune,” says Timberlake. “It was just one of those things where when the punch lines fit in with the melody so good. We kind of just wrote the song in the back of this guitar shop.”

When the song was later recorded in the studio and on film, the silliness grew. Though “Please Mr. Kennedy” becomes a hit in the film, it’s everything Llewyn detests about music. It’s a pop music hell for him; he’s just there for some quick cash.

With Timberlake and Isaac (a proficient musician, himself) on guitar, they’re joined by Adam Driver (“Girls”) who, in a cowboy hat, adds some of the more ridiculous harmonies. (“Adam Driver is a deeply courageous actor,” says Burnett.) Ethan Coen, in particular, pushed them to add quirks like a repeated “pah- pah- pah-” before the “please.”

Molded by Burnett, Timberlake, the Coen brothers, Isaac and Driver, the song may very well be one of the most absurd collections of talent for a recording. It’s also a hit. Moviegoers and critics have raved about “Please Mr. Kennedy” since the film first debuted at the Cannes Film Festival in May.

But the unusual group of musicians, actors and filmmakers was perfectly suited to Timberlake. He also jumped in to sing bass on the a cappella “Auld Triangle” with the Punch Brothers and Marcus Mumford. It was a surreal swirl of music and moviemaking. The Coens, says Timberlake, are “the equivalent of Dylan in the film industry.”

“We just all jammed together for a couple weeks,” says Timberlake. “So you felt like this counter-culture collective.”

“I don’t like rules of ‘well, this is what you do, or this is the picture frame you’re supposed to live in,’” he says. “You just never know what might come out of trying everything.”

inside-llewyn-davis-timberlake-650-430

Justin Timberlake’s song from “Inside Llewyn Davis,” Taylor Swift’s track from “One Chance” and Coldplay’s closing credits tune from “Hunger Games: Catching Fire” received nominations for the 71st annual Golden Globes on Thursday.

Timberlake’s “Please Mr. Kennedy,” Swift’s “Sweeter Than Fiction” and Coldplay’s “Atlas” will go up against U2′s “Ordinary Love” from “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom” and the Idina Menzel showcase “Let It Go” from the animated Disney film “Frozen.”

One pop music figure, Alex Ebert of Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeroes, received a nomination in the score category. His work for “All is Lost” goes up against newcomer Steven Price’s “Gravity”, John Williams’ “The Book Thief,” Hans Zimmer’s “12 Years a Slave” and Alex Heffes’ “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom.”

Best actor in a mini-series or TV movie was three-fifths music-related: Michael Douglas, who portrays Liberace, and Matt Damon were nominated for “Behind the Candelabra” and Al Pacino is up for his leading role in “Phil Spector.” Both films aired on HBO.

Among the other nominations for music-related work in film and TV were a best actor in a comedy or music nom for Oscar Isaac who portrays the folksinger Llewyn Davis in the Coen brothers’ “Inside Llewyn Davis”; Hayden Panettiere is up for supporting actress in a series, mini-series or TV movie for her role in ABC’s “Nashville”; “Behind the Candelabra” is up for best movie or TV mini-series and “Inside Llewyn Davis” is nominated for best motion picture, musical or comedy. Jared Leto, who has focused on his alt-rock band Thirty Seconds to Mars in recent years, is up for supporting actor in a motion picture, for “Dallas Buyers Club.”

The Golden Globes are determined by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, a group of journalists who write for publications outside the U.S. Awards will be handed out Jan. 12.

Best Original Song — Motion Picture

  • “Atlas”, The Hunger Games: Catching Fire
    Music by: Chris Martin, Guy Berryman, Jonny Buckland, Will Champion // Lyrics by: Chris Martin, Guy Berryman, Jonny Buckland, Will Champion
  • “Let It Go”, Frozen
    Music by: Kristen Anderson Lopez, Robert Lopez // Lyrics by: Kristen Anderson Lopez, Robert Lopez
  • “Ordinary Love”, Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom
    Music by: Bono, The Edge, Adam Clayton, Larry Mullen, Jr., Brian Burton // Lyrics by: Bono
  • “Please Mr Kennedy”, Inside Llewyn Davis
    Music by: Ed Rush, George Cromarty, T Bone Burnett, Justin Timberlake, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen // Lyrics by: Ed Rush, George Cromarty, T Bone Burnett, Justin Timberlake, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
  • “Sweeter Than Fiction”, One Chance
    Music by: Taylor Swift, Jack Antonoff // Lyrics by: Taylor Swift, Jack Antonoff

Best Original Song — Motion Picture

  • Alex Ebert, All Is Lost
  • Alex Heffes, Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom
  • Steven Price, Gravity
  • John Williams, The Book Thief
  • Hans Zimmer, 12 Years A Slave

Inside Llewyn Davis — Three Nominations

  • Best Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical
  • Oscar Isaac, Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical
  • “Please Mr. Kennedy,” Best Original Song – Motion Picture

Behind the Candelabra — Four Nominations

  • Best Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
  • Matt Damon, Best Performance By an Actor in a Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
  • Michael Douglas, Best Performance By an Actor in a Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
  • Rob Lowe, Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Phil Spector — Two Nominations

  • Helen Mirren, Best Performance By an Actress in a Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
  • Al Pacino, Best Performance By an Actor in a Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

“It’s fun to use my singing voice as part of a character,” says pop superstar  Justin  Timberlake, describing how he toned down his vibrato and adjusted his  guitar-strumming to portray clean-cut, early ’60s folk singer Jim Berkey in the  Coen brothers’ “Inside  Llewyn Davis.” One of the most delightful scenes in the movie, which opened  Friday, involves a spirited recording session for a goofy novelty song called  “Please Mr. Kennedy” — a plea to not be drafted into the space race.

Justin Timberlake

Jim sets the pace, instructing his musician buddy Llewyn (Oscar  Isaac) on where to jump in and how many “puh-puh” P sounds to insert before  the word “please.” They then launch into a driving, deadpan version of the  nonsensical song while their pal Al Cody (Adam Driver) blurts out “Uh-oh!” and  other doo-wop exclamations for a comic top note.

Llewyn, described by the movie’s executive music producer, T Bone Burnett, as  “a moody existentialist” folk singer struggling to get by in the ’60s music  scene, finds the song appalling, but Jim can’t see a problem with it. “If people  want a campy song, Jim’s happy to write it,” says Timberlake. “He kind of  represents where the world was going. The beatniks of that time looked at music  like, ‘This isn’t a career, man, this is art.’ But if you look at the music  business now — you’re not anything until you’ve made an actual career out of  being a musician.”

If Timberlake was ever concerned about his own bona fides, he may have  overcompensated. The night before he sat down to chat, he’d been anointed both  favorite male soul/R&B artist and favorite male pop/rock artist at the American  Music Awards. While others in the “Inside Llewyn Davis” cast were promoting  the movie with intimate musical performances in New York and L.A., Timberlake  was kicking off a world tour around the recent pair of albums he dubbed “The  20/20 Experience”: He played for a capacity crowd of 18,000 at the Staples  Center in November and heads to the Forum on Jan. 20.

With a raft of film roles now to his credits, until Joel  Coen called he’d never gotten to play a musician. “I think I said yes before  he finished the sentence,” says Timberlake. “I knew I wanted to mix music and  movie-making. To get to do it with the Coen brothers is kind of  unbelievable.”

Burnett, who’s worked on some of the choicest music-driven movies ever,  including the Coens’ “O Brother, Where Art Thou?,” doesn’t hesitate to give  Timberlake his due. “Justin is a bad man,” he asserts, indulging in  musician-speak. “He’s a real artist. He’ll get after it. He lays down the law.  He’s not an empty-headed pop singer. He’s got a lot going on.”

In “Llewyn Davis,” Timberlake sings lead in a three-part harmony performance  of Hedy West’s “500 Miles,” one of the more lyrical and beloved songs of the  period. But it’s “Please Mr. Kennedy” that’s getting the most attention this  awards season; the song has been submitted for Golden  Globe consideration (it’s ineligible for the Academy  Awards since it was adapted from existing material).

Timberlake remembers the collaboration (he’s among the credited writers).  “Bone and I messed around with some chords and strumming patterns that felt more  like the Coasters, with kind of a sunny, stoney groove,” he says, bobbing his  head. “We played it for Joel and Ethan by speakerphone.” The original “Please  Mr. Kennedy” (a slower, doo-wop Motown tune recorded by Mickey Woods) was a plea  to avoid the Vietnam draft.

“We all thought, let’s make it funny; let’s make it about space exploration  instead. Joel and Ethan came up with a lot of the jokes and refined it. When we  recorded it, certain things just happened in the moment, and in the editing they  went for what was funniest” — including such lines as “I’m 6-foot-2, so perhaps  you’ll / tell me I’m too big for the capsule.”

The shooting schedule for “Inside Llewyn Davis” required all the songs to be  recorded upfront, in a weeklong Manhattan studio session that Timberlake says  became a creative bonus. “You’d get in there and play the song the way you  thought your character would do it, and that’s how you found the details.  There’s a real specificity to the way you play and sing in character.”

131204-oscar-isaac-and-justin-timberlake-in-inside-llewyn-davis

In Joel and Ethan Coen’s upcoming film Inside Llewyn Davis, Oscar Isaac plays the title character, a struggling musician in the Greenwich Village folk scene of the early ’60s. He has a hard time getting gigs, has no home of his own, and keeps losing a cat. It’s an unsentimental movie, but also a frequently beautiful one, thanks in no small part to the sensitive, layered work of its star, who performed all his own music.

There’s an Oscar Isaac/likely Oscar nomination pun to be made, but I’m not gonna make it. Instead, I’ll direct you to the conversation I had with the congenial actor, who was calling from London the night after joining Marcus Mumford, Jack White, the film’s music supervisor T Bone Burnett, and others in a concert of the film’s music at Manhattan’s Town Hall.

Did the Coens discuss how they wanted you to approach performing these old folk songs?
It was funny: When I was going to audition, I knew the part was kind of being based on [New York City folk singer] Dave Van Ronk, and the one song they had sent for the audition was his “Hang Me.” I learned that one and then, because I’m obsessive that way, I listened to everything Dave Van Ronk ever recorded, and I read his book The Mayor of MacDougal Street, and I started playing his songs. So when I came in to audition, I’d learned three other Van Ronk arrangements. However, I don’t have the same voice he has — he’s got this growl, and he knows how to howl. My voice is quite different. I knew that I had to be true to that and not try to put something else on it too much.

There’s a scene in the film where your character is watching the competing folksinger Troy Nelson sing in this really mannered style, which is sort of the opposite of how Llewyn Davis sings. And Davis says that Nelson “doesn’t have any higher function.” Did you sit and down and distinguish between your character as being more emotional authentic than the other singers in the film?
I didn’t, man. What’s amazing is that there’s a strange phenomenon with the Coens where they don’t really tell anybody how a scene needs to be. The emotion is just somehow infused into the writing and the people that they cast. The tone emerges; it gets teased out and coaxed out by all of us. It’s a really weird thing. I was expecting that T Bone was going to put me through boot camp, and it was none of that. I showed up to T Bone’s place and he was like, “Hey, have you heard the new Tom Waits album?” and put on the record and left the room for an hour. And then he’d come back and be like “Want to play a song?” and I’d play a song, and then we’d go take a walk and we’d come back, and he’d say, ‘Play it again, you’re really good, maybe change that to a C instead.” It was all very easy. But you look at the movie, and it seems directed within an inch of its life, because the tone is so specific and right on. It seems so precise, and yet that precision — it happens, and I don’t really know how.

You sing in the movie with your co-star, Justin Timberlake. Was that intimidating?
Yeah, it was incredibly intimidating. Justin has near-perfect pitch. It was very, very intimidating.

Did he do anything to put you at ease?
Yeah. He was just himself, and that put me at ease. He’s really easy-going and really funny and just incredibly supportive and excited to be there.

Presumably you weren’t a giant folk music fan before taking the part. Did getting into that genre change the way you think about it now?
It feels incredibly relevant to me now. I think people are on a search for authenticity, and it feels like a particularly rootless time. People are always lamenting times past — that’s just part of existence — but there is something . . . these ideas of man as an island and people isolated among the vastness of existence, they are really percolating around these days. But folk music connects us back to our roots. T Bone says that the greatest democratizing act in the history of man kind is when Alan Lomax and those people did all their field recordings and recorded all the poor people’s songs and then broadcast it throughout earth and space. That basically fulfilled the prophesy of, “The meek shall inherit the earth.” It’s an incredible thing that happened. To try and connect back to that impulse — I think that’s what folk music does.

Llewyn Davis is extremely unsympathetic in the film, except when he’s singing. How much of a challenge was it to convey that shift?
That was the big challenge for me. Llewyn doesn’t show who he is. He is not connecting. Even though he wants too, he doesn’t want to show any warmth through any traditional means — he doesn’t try to charm anybody, he doesn’t try to ingratiate himself at all. How do you connect to someone who is such an island? The only window into his soul — because he doesn’t have a cathartic moment where he reveals himself or cries — is when he sings those songs. That idea was very much in the forefront of my mind. That’s why it was so necessary to do the music performances live on film with no playback or click tracks or anything. If we’re waiting all this time to see him open up, and if when he does you can tell it’s a movie trick, then there would be no reason to invest emotionally. But the fact that you’re seeing something live, you’re actually seeing the thing that he does, that’s what makes it effective.

If you read a book that covers the same period covered in the movie, something like The Mayor of MacDougal Street or Bob Dylan’s Chronicles, it’s very easy to get caught up in the romance of that time and place. But the film doesn’t. Do you see it as being more truthful, in a way, than the non-fiction it’s based on?
What’s funny in The Mayor of MacDougal Street is how Dave Van Ronk talks a lot about the time and how exciting it was and how electric it was. MacDougal Street was just packed with all these people coming down. Washington Square Park had all the warring factions: the bluegrass guys hating the drummers, the jazz guys hating each other. And then there will be a paragraph about this shitty trip to Chicago he took, but then Van Ronk gets back to the fun part. That hard part is the part the Coens seize upon — that shitty trip to Chicago, because that’s where the music comes from. It comes from desperation, it comes from a dark place, it comes from all that pressure. One of the most exciting times in New York, and that’s where you follow this guy? It’s a smart move by the Coens not to do the obvious thing.

How good a guitar fingerpicker were you before you started working on the movie?
I was okay, but I didn’t know the Travis picking style style that Llewyn uses. I obsessed non-stop over that and now I can’t get out of it. I’ve still got the nails and everything.

What other research did you do for the role?
I read Dylan’s Chronicles and really delved into his repertoire. I listened to a lot of records that Dave Van Ronk would have listened to: Reverend Gary Davis and Lightnin’ Hopkins. I thought about Buster Keaton a lot, about the comedy of resilience. He’s somebody who doesn’t seem to show a whole lot in his face, but just keeps moving through space, no matter what the obstacle might be. A lot of Charles Bukowski, too. There’s a poem by Bukowski called “Bluebird” which was a bit of a mantra for me: There is a bluebird in my heart that wants to get out / But I’m too tough for him.

It only makes sense that a movie about a folk singer would include a soundtrack album, and the Coen brothers’ Inside Llewyn Davis will get one late this summer. The soundtrack features songs by Bob Dylan and Dave Van Ronk, along with tunes performed by stars of the movie, including Justin Timberlake, Oscar Isaac and Carey Mulligan, as well as Marcus Mumford (Mulligan’s husband) and the Punch Brothers.

The 14-song collection, produced by T Bone Burnett, Joel Coen and Ethan Coen, is due out September 17th on Nonesuch (pre-order it here). It’s the Coens’ fourth collaboration with Burnett, whose soundtrack to their 2000 film O Brother, Where Art Thou? won five Grammys.

Cannes 2013: 15 Movies to Watch For – ‘Inside Llewyn Davis’

Inside Llewyn Davis chronicles a struggling young folk singer, played by Isaacs, as he tries to find his place in the burgeoning Greenwich Village folk scene in 1961. The movie recently won the Grand Prix at the Cannes International Film Festival. It will premiere in the United States on December 6th.

Inside Llewyn Davis chronicles a struggling young folk singer, played by Isaacs, as he tries to find his place in the burgeoning Greenwich Village folk scene in 1961. The movie recently won the Grand Prix at the Cannes International Film Festival. It will premiere in the United States on December 6th.

The track listing, and a red-band trailer, are below:

“Hang Me, Oh Hang Me” (Traditional; Arranged by T Bone Burnett) – Oscar Isaac
“Fare Thee Well (Dink’s Song)” (Traditional; Arranged by Oscar Isaac and T Bone Burnett) – Marcus Mumford and Oscar Isaac
“The Last Thing on My Mind” (Tom Paxton) – Stark Sands
“Five Hundred Miles” (Hedy West) – Justin Timberlake, Carey Mulligan and Stark Sands
“Please Mr. Kennedy” (Ed Rush, George Cromarty, T Bone Burnett, Justin Timberlake, Joel Coen and Ethan Coen) – Oscar Isaac, Justin Timberlake and Adam Driver
“Green, Green Rocky Road” (Len Chandler and Robert Kaufman) – Oscar Isaac
“The Death of Queen Jane” (Traditional; Arranged by Oscar Isaac and T Bone Burnett) – Oscar Isaac
“The Roving Gambler” (Traditional) – John Cohen with the Down Hill Strugglers
“The Shoals of Herring” (Ewan MacColl) – Oscar Isaac
“The Auld Triangle” (Brendan Behan) – Chris Thile, Chris Eldridge, Marcus Mumford, Justin Timberlake and Gabe Witcher
“The Storms Are on the Ocean” (A.P. Carter) – Nancy Blake
“Fare Thee Well (Dink’s Song) (Traditional; Arranged by Oscar Isaac and T Bone Burnett) – Oscar Isaac
“Farewell” (Bob Dylan) – Bob Dylan
“Green, Green Rocky Road” (Len Chandler and Robert Kaufman) – Dave Van Ronk

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CANNES, France — Justin Timberlake is making the most of his first full Cannes Film Festival experience and he’s helping his fellow actors from Inside Llewyn Davis enjoy it, as well.

As the crew — including Carey Mulligan, Oscar Isaac and John Goodman — assembled on the steps of the theater before the film’s gala screening Sunday night, Goodman realized he didn’t have time to take a personal photo with his smartphone.

As officials urged the actors to take their seats, Timberlake grabbed Goodman’s camera and darted through the crowd outside.

“As they were yanking us in I said, ‘Give me your phone’ and I jetted out there,” Timberlake says. “I took a picture of it and brought it back in and gave it to him. Everything around here is late except for the screening of the movie.”

Timberlake also helped Isaac truly appreciate his Cannes moment.

“When we were all standing up on the steps, I was staring into the abyss of cameras and light,” Isaac recalls. “And Justin was like, ‘Look out to the right.’ And there was this sea of people all looking to see this (movie) happen. I hadn’t even seen that. I was like, ‘Oh, man. It was huge.’ “.

Davis has won plaudits his role in the movie about the ’60s folk scene, which is directed by Joel and Ethan Coen. Timberlake, too, has seen solid notices for his role as an earnest performer.

He says he would have “run craft services” to be part of a Coen brothers project and he is soaking up every moment in the south of France.

He had been to the festival to promote 2007′s Shrek the Third at the behest of DreamWorks head Jeffrey Katzenberg, but “I think he just wanted to come to Cannes and come to the beach.”

This is Timberlake’s first time being part of a competition film, and he said he had his moment when the applause began at the end of the movie. Most of it was directed at Isaac who is in nearly every scene.

“The credits came up and there was this huge ovation for Oscar,” says Timberlake. “He was in the eye of the storm and had the movie on his shoulders. It was a ‘Voila!’ moment. I was just really proud and happy.”

Don’t worry. You didn’t miss an impromptu basement performance in the Village by Carey Mulligan and Justin Timberlake.

The twosome are indeed singing together, however, in a photo from Inside Llewyn Davis.

J.T. and the Great Gatsby actress star along Oscar Isaac (who plays the titular character) in the Joel and Ethan Coen-directed drama due out later this year.

The film tells the story of Llewyn, a singer-songwriter navigating the 1960s folk scene in New York City.

Oscar told Complex magazine earlier this year that Justin and Carey’s husband, Marcus Mumford, “were a big part of recording to the music” for the movie’s soundtrack.